Washing Station Owner: Gora Kone Washing Station /Managed & operated by Testi Trading
Varietal(s): Heirloom (Arabica)
Processing: Natural
Altitude: 1,900 to 2,050 metres above sea level
Owner: Various smallholder farmers
Town: Werka, West Arsi Zone
Region: Nensebo Woreda, Sidamo
Country: Ethopia
Total size of farm: Under 1 hectare on average

Single Origin: Sidamo Werka Uchuro, Ethiopia

In Stock
£6.95
This field can't be Empty
This field can't be Empty
This field can't be Empty
Clear
SKU: N/A Category:

Description

Roaster’s tasting notes: An awesome offering, soft red fruit, with a candy sweetness, all encompassed in a velvety mouthfeel. Just lovely. 

Additional information:

This exceptional lot was processed, dry milled and exported by Testi Coffee, a family-run business owned and managed by the Yonis family, who are making a name for themselves on the Ethiopian Specialty Coffee scene. For many years (see below on the Ethiopian Commodity Exchange – ECX),  wholesalers have been unable to secure good traceability information on many Ethiopian lots. As of 2017, all this is now changing.

The first person in the Yonis family to get seriously involved with coffee was Faysel A. Yonis. Faysel began working with coffee in the late 1990s, but at the time he was purely involved in supplying the local market. As the potential for specialty coffee in the country increased, Faysel saw opportunity. Even though he was still constrained by the ECX, he had a feeling that things would change. Faysel established Testi Coffee in 2009 as a coffee exporting company, set about surrounding himself with exceptional coffee professionals, and hired his nephew, Adham, raised and educated in the USA, to help with outreach and marketing.

Today, Testi owns and/or operates four washing stations in Guji, Yirgacheffe, Sidamo and in Limu – all premier coffee producing regions. This lot was processed using the natural method at Gora Kone washing station in Sidamo, which they operate on behalf of a partner. The cherry is delivered to various collection points and is then taken to the washing station, where it is delivered to dry for between 15 and 18 days, during which time it is stringently raked and sorted so as to preserve quality.

They work with small holder farmers, with the aim of securing the very best prices for their coffee so that they can pay fair prices for the cherry delivered. They have also recently established a 250 hectare farm in the Bench Maji Zone, where they plan to experiment with organic practices. They are currently also building a warehouse in Shakiso where they can process natural coffees locally, in the region where the coffee is grown. This keeps more revenue in the communities where the coffees are produced.

Testi’s objective is quality and building long term business relationships. Their washing stations are very well run and they do diligent work through sorting and screening to get clean and quality beans for export. Testi always adheres to the very highest quality standards to prepare and deliver nothing but high quality beans.

As of 2018, Testi has launched a quality improvement project at each of the four washing stations that they operate. Their PCS (Premium Cherry Selection) Project fully controls all aspects of harvest and processing in order to ensure that the fantastic natural quality of the coffee is maintained at each step. They are also making the most of the market liberalisation to benefit the small producers that they work with. Social projects, such as building new classrooms for the local school near their Guji processing factory are also important, and with support from their importing partners (watch this space) they hope to do even more in the future. They also currently have a drinking/household water provisioning project underway in Guji, and they plan to extend this to other communities in the future.

The name ‘Testi’ means Happy or Happiness in Harrari language (it is also the name of Faysel’s middle son). Certainly Testi is bringing happiness to small scale producers and roasters alike!

Gora Kone Coffee Washing Station
Gora Kone Washing Station was established in 2011 and is run by Testi on behalf of one of their partners. Testi oversees all quality protocols, manages the stations during on & off season, and mills and exports the products.
Between 700 and 800 smallholder farmers deliver cherry to three different collection points, which in turn bring the coffee to Debo Washing station. The washing station exports up to 5 containers annually.

About the Sidamo region:
Sidamo (or Sidama – the latter refers to the Sidama people, the former is what used to be known as Sidamo province) covers a large area in Southern Ethiopia spreading through the fertile highlands south from Lake Awasa in the Rift Valley. It is made up of over 20 different administrative areas, or ‘woredas’, with varying microclimates and altitudes; accordingly, there is a big variety of both grades and cup profiles that end up labeled as Sidamo. In fact, the famous Yirgacheffe region geographically lies within Sidamo, though it is ultimately classified as its own coffee region.

Much of the administrative confusion is due to various historical administrative designations and confusion between these and (often conflicting) modern ones. It is important to keep in mind that while all coffees bearing the name ‘Sidamo/Sidama’ DO hail from the larger Sidamo territory, they may not hail directly from the Sidamo state (which is a smaller region). Most central-southern coffees from Ethiopia are considered ‘Sidamo’ and are then classified further using specific town names or micro-regions.

About the Ethiopian Commodity Exchange and Traceability:
For many years, Ethiopian coffee, some of the best in the world, was for the most part untraceable.

Starting in 2008, Ethiopia began the centralisation of all coffee exports through the Ethiopia Commodity Exchange (ECX), where the coffees were ‘anonymised’, stripped of any information other than region, in the interest of the farmers, who were meant to receive top dollar for quality regardless of the ‘name’ of the washing station or farm. Coffees moving through the ECX were (still are) delivered to certified coffee labs, where they were cupped according to profile then graded and marked generically for export. This ‘equalising’ measure certainly benefitted some producers, but it had the negative impact of eliminating most roasters’ and importers’ ability to provide accurate information of the precise traceability of coffees. Even after the opening of the ‘second window’ (devised for direct sales of cooperative and certified coffee), as of the end of 2017 some 90 percent of coffees still moved through the ECX.

The end of March 2017 saw a huge overturning of this mandatory system. In a bill raised by the Ethiopian Coffee & Tea Development and Marketing Authority, Ethiopian coffee (even that sold through the ECX) can be marketed and sold with full traceability intact. The aim is to limit black market dealings, to demand higher prices and to enable Ethiopian producers to share in a greater piece of the pie.

In a bit more detail, the new system proposes that any exporter with a valid license will be allowed to sell directly to buyers without placing the coffee on the ECX first. There is a slight caveat – the parchment coffee will have to be sold within three days of arriving at the processing plant in Addis. If it is still unsold after three days (which is quite likely), it must be sold through the ECX: BUT with its traceability info intact rather than being deleted. Additionally, it is proposed that oversees companies will be able to plant and sell coffee.
Experts have commented that the reforms will actually create a system very like Ethiopia’s before the 2008 changes. Quoted in the financial times, Arkebe Oqubay, the government minister overseeing the reform, said he expects Ethiopia’s annual coffee exports to “soar”.

Additional information

Bag Size

250g, 1KG

Description

Roaster’s tasting notes: An awesome offering, soft red fruit, with a candy sweetness, all encompassed in a velvety mouthfeel. Just lovely. 

Additional information:

This exceptional lot was processed, dry milled and exported by Testi Coffee, a family-run business owned and managed by the Yonis family, who are making a name for themselves on the Ethiopian Specialty Coffee scene. For many years (see below on the Ethiopian Commodity Exchange – ECX),  wholesalers have been unable to secure good traceability information on many Ethiopian lots. As of 2017, all this is now changing.

The first person in the Yonis family to get seriously involved with coffee was Faysel A. Yonis. Faysel began working with coffee in the late 1990s, but at the time he was purely involved in supplying the local market. As the potential for specialty coffee in the country increased, Faysel saw opportunity. Even though he was still constrained by the ECX, he had a feeling that things would change. Faysel established Testi Coffee in 2009 as a coffee exporting company, set about surrounding himself with exceptional coffee professionals, and hired his nephew, Adham, raised and educated in the USA, to help with outreach and marketing.

Today, Testi owns and/or operates four washing stations in Guji, Yirgacheffe, Sidamo and in Limu – all premier coffee producing regions. This lot was processed using the natural method at Gora Kone washing station in Sidamo, which they operate on behalf of a partner. The cherry is delivered to various collection points and is then taken to the washing station, where it is delivered to dry for between 15 and 18 days, during which time it is stringently raked and sorted so as to preserve quality.

They work with small holder farmers, with the aim of securing the very best prices for their coffee so that they can pay fair prices for the cherry delivered. They have also recently established a 250 hectare farm in the Bench Maji Zone, where they plan to experiment with organic practices. They are currently also building a warehouse in Shakiso where they can process natural coffees locally, in the region where the coffee is grown. This keeps more revenue in the communities where the coffees are produced.

Testi’s objective is quality and building long term business relationships. Their washing stations are very well run and they do diligent work through sorting and screening to get clean and quality beans for export. Testi always adheres to the very highest quality standards to prepare and deliver nothing but high quality beans.

As of 2018, Testi has launched a quality improvement project at each of the four washing stations that they operate. Their PCS (Premium Cherry Selection) Project fully controls all aspects of harvest and processing in order to ensure that the fantastic natural quality of the coffee is maintained at each step. They are also making the most of the market liberalisation to benefit the small producers that they work with. Social projects, such as building new classrooms for the local school near their Guji processing factory are also important, and with support from their importing partners (watch this space) they hope to do even more in the future. They also currently have a drinking/household water provisioning project underway in Guji, and they plan to extend this to other communities in the future.

The name ‘Testi’ means Happy or Happiness in Harrari language (it is also the name of Faysel’s middle son). Certainly Testi is bringing happiness to small scale producers and roasters alike!

Gora Kone Coffee Washing Station
Gora Kone Washing Station was established in 2011 and is run by Testi on behalf of one of their partners. Testi oversees all quality protocols, manages the stations during on & off season, and mills and exports the products.
Between 700 and 800 smallholder farmers deliver cherry to three different collection points, which in turn bring the coffee to Debo Washing station. The washing station exports up to 5 containers annually.

About the Sidamo region:
Sidamo (or Sidama – the latter refers to the Sidama people, the former is what used to be known as Sidamo province) covers a large area in Southern Ethiopia spreading through the fertile highlands south from Lake Awasa in the Rift Valley. It is made up of over 20 different administrative areas, or ‘woredas’, with varying microclimates and altitudes; accordingly, there is a big variety of both grades and cup profiles that end up labeled as Sidamo. In fact, the famous Yirgacheffe region geographically lies within Sidamo, though it is ultimately classified as its own coffee region.

Much of the administrative confusion is due to various historical administrative designations and confusion between these and (often conflicting) modern ones. It is important to keep in mind that while all coffees bearing the name ‘Sidamo/Sidama’ DO hail from the larger Sidamo territory, they may not hail directly from the Sidamo state (which is a smaller region). Most central-southern coffees from Ethiopia are considered ‘Sidamo’ and are then classified further using specific town names or micro-regions.

About the Ethiopian Commodity Exchange and Traceability:
For many years, Ethiopian coffee, some of the best in the world, was for the most part untraceable.

Starting in 2008, Ethiopia began the centralisation of all coffee exports through the Ethiopia Commodity Exchange (ECX), where the coffees were ‘anonymised’, stripped of any information other than region, in the interest of the farmers, who were meant to receive top dollar for quality regardless of the ‘name’ of the washing station or farm. Coffees moving through the ECX were (still are) delivered to certified coffee labs, where they were cupped according to profile then graded and marked generically for export. This ‘equalising’ measure certainly benefitted some producers, but it had the negative impact of eliminating most roasters’ and importers’ ability to provide accurate information of the precise traceability of coffees. Even after the opening of the ‘second window’ (devised for direct sales of cooperative and certified coffee), as of the end of 2017 some 90 percent of coffees still moved through the ECX.

The end of March 2017 saw a huge overturning of this mandatory system. In a bill raised by the Ethiopian Coffee & Tea Development and Marketing Authority, Ethiopian coffee (even that sold through the ECX) can be marketed and sold with full traceability intact. The aim is to limit black market dealings, to demand higher prices and to enable Ethiopian producers to share in a greater piece of the pie.

In a bit more detail, the new system proposes that any exporter with a valid license will be allowed to sell directly to buyers without placing the coffee on the ECX first. There is a slight caveat – the parchment coffee will have to be sold within three days of arriving at the processing plant in Addis. If it is still unsold after three days (which is quite likely), it must be sold through the ECX: BUT with its traceability info intact rather than being deleted. Additionally, it is proposed that oversees companies will be able to plant and sell coffee.
Experts have commented that the reforms will actually create a system very like Ethiopia’s before the 2008 changes. Quoted in the financial times, Arkebe Oqubay, the government minister overseeing the reform, said he expects Ethiopia’s annual coffee exports to “soar”.

Additional information

Bag Size

250g, 1KG

Delivery Charges within the UK
Under £60 spend £2.90 RM Second Class
Over £60 spend FREE RM Second Class