Roast Style: Medium light

Farm: Guardian del Bosque
Varietals: Red Bourbon and Geisha
Processing: Natural
Altitude: 1,800 meters above sea level
Owners: Carloman Carranza
Town: Gracias a Dios – Lonya Grande
Region: Amazonas
Country: Peru
Farm Size: 6 hectares
Certification: Organic

Single Estate, Guardian del Bosque, Peru – Natural, Organic

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£7.95
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Description

Roaster’s tasting notes:

This is my first coffee from Carloman Carranza’s farm ‘The Guardian of the Forest’ and also my first Peruvian natural. As with many Peruvian farms it is certified organic.

Lower in ferment than many African naturals this coffee delivers a super sweet jammy profile. Ripe red stone fruits blend with a marshmallow sweetness resulting in a syrup like body. Delicious if I say so myself.

Additional information:

Through extensive cupping, Carloman Carranza’s farm has been singled out as some of the top lots from the region this year by Alpes Andinos, our exporting partners in Peru. Carloman’s farm is located in the town of Gracias a Dios in the department of Amazonas, about 4 hours from the association’s headquarters in Jaen, high in Peru’s Cajamarca department.

Carloman lives in the village Gracias a Dios in the district of Lonya Grande and is skilled with the cultivation and production of coffee. In addition to growing coffee, he also raises cattle to diversify his income. The farm’s name, Guardian del Bosque, means ‘Guardian of the Forest,’ and was deemed so because Carloman protects a portion of his land as native forests to preserve flora and fauna.

Some of the most difficult challenges on his farm are the torrential rains that can cause landslides on the steep slopes within the Amazonas region.   strategic planting and intercropping help ameliorate these threats.

Consistent ‘selective’ tree pruning is conducted to maintain the quality of the crop and to increase its yield. Farmers work in 15-year rotations, focusing on each variety individually. When a plant reaches the end of its 15-year life cycle, it will be dramatically cut back using the ‘Zoqueo’ practice. This sees the tree cut back to the stem just 30 centimetres from the ground, stimulating the emergence of new growth. In preparation for this event, trees of the same variety are planted two years in advance, meaning there is an uninterrupted supply of mature cherry.

For fertiliser, Carloman uses a mixture of compost and ‘guano de las Islas’, meaning guano from the islands. Located just off the coast of Peru are a collection of small islands, home to large sea bird populations. These birds produce large amounts of excrement, or, guano, which settles on the ground as a nutrient-rich top layer. Guano is collected on the island and transported to the mainland to be used as a fertiliser.

Carloman’s harvest spans from May to October. Coffee processing techniques in the region are tried and tested methods of production, often passed down through the generations. This lot begins with the cherries being selectively handpicked, before being floated in cool clean water to remove any low-density cherries. Once the coffee is washed and sorted, he leaves the cherries in a tank of water for 8 hours and waits until the water is complete drained. The cherries are then fermented in another tank for an additional 72 hours to breakdown the exterior pulp. The coffee is moved to a solar dryer where it dries until the moisture content reaches 11%, which can take 20 – 25 days.

Additional information

Bag Size

250g, 1KG

Description

Roaster’s tasting notes:

This is my first coffee from Carloman Carranza’s farm ‘The Guardian of the Forest’ and also my first Peruvian natural. As with many Peruvian farms it is certified organic.

Lower in ferment than many African naturals this coffee delivers a super sweet jammy profile. Ripe red stone fruits blend with a marshmallow sweetness resulting in a syrup like body. Delicious if I say so myself.

Additional information:

Through extensive cupping, Carloman Carranza’s farm has been singled out as some of the top lots from the region this year by Alpes Andinos, our exporting partners in Peru. Carloman’s farm is located in the town of Gracias a Dios in the department of Amazonas, about 4 hours from the association’s headquarters in Jaen, high in Peru’s Cajamarca department.

Carloman lives in the village Gracias a Dios in the district of Lonya Grande and is skilled with the cultivation and production of coffee. In addition to growing coffee, he also raises cattle to diversify his income. The farm’s name, Guardian del Bosque, means ‘Guardian of the Forest,’ and was deemed so because Carloman protects a portion of his land as native forests to preserve flora and fauna.

Some of the most difficult challenges on his farm are the torrential rains that can cause landslides on the steep slopes within the Amazonas region.   strategic planting and intercropping help ameliorate these threats.

Consistent ‘selective’ tree pruning is conducted to maintain the quality of the crop and to increase its yield. Farmers work in 15-year rotations, focusing on each variety individually. When a plant reaches the end of its 15-year life cycle, it will be dramatically cut back using the ‘Zoqueo’ practice. This sees the tree cut back to the stem just 30 centimetres from the ground, stimulating the emergence of new growth. In preparation for this event, trees of the same variety are planted two years in advance, meaning there is an uninterrupted supply of mature cherry.

For fertiliser, Carloman uses a mixture of compost and ‘guano de las Islas’, meaning guano from the islands. Located just off the coast of Peru are a collection of small islands, home to large sea bird populations. These birds produce large amounts of excrement, or, guano, which settles on the ground as a nutrient-rich top layer. Guano is collected on the island and transported to the mainland to be used as a fertiliser.

Carloman’s harvest spans from May to October. Coffee processing techniques in the region are tried and tested methods of production, often passed down through the generations. This lot begins with the cherries being selectively handpicked, before being floated in cool clean water to remove any low-density cherries. Once the coffee is washed and sorted, he leaves the cherries in a tank of water for 8 hours and waits until the water is complete drained. The cherries are then fermented in another tank for an additional 72 hours to breakdown the exterior pulp. The coffee is moved to a solar dryer where it dries until the moisture content reaches 11%, which can take 20 – 25 days.

Additional information

Bag Size

250g, 1KG